books

Cover Reveal: AJ Linn’s A Gentleman’s Fate

As many of my readers know, author AJ Linn is a friend of mine. You can find my other article about him here. Everything AJ Linn is doing is a testament to why it’s so incredibly important to support independent authors. Not only does he dream up and write books, but he formats and publishes them as well. He’ll tell you how hard it is, but he does it because he loves it (no matter how much he grumbles) and he does it for his fans. I am honored to be a part of the big reveal (albeit late…) of the cover to his newest book, A Gentleman’s Fate.  Read on for an excerpt from his new book, and learn more about this amazing author.

Book-cover-release

An Excerpt from A Gentleman’s Fate

We arrive at the dock, and before us is the hard-not-to-miss gondola, filled with red roses and surrounded by dozens of tiny white flickering votives. The priest and the gondolier are standing by, making the big surprise even more obvious with their shit-eating grins. It quickly becomes apparent to Scarlett what’s happening, and she doesn’t say a word. She just stands there, stunned, speechless, and horrified.

“Come aboard, happy couple!” the gondolier says, attempting an American accent, not overshadowing his own thick Italian. “We have-a da champagne on ice for da celebration of this most joyous of occasions!”

“The celebration? Donovan? What’s going on?” she asks, not taking her eyes off of the priest. “What is this?”

“This, Scarlett, is me trying to marry you. The romantic shit that you hate, remember?”

“Donovan?” A confused, terrified look sweeps across her face.

About AJ Linn:

A.J. Linn published his debut novel, A Gentleman’s Affair, Volume 1 of The Gentleman’s Series, in May, 2013.

Since that time, he has continued protagonist Donovan Hart’s story in A Gentleman’s Secret, published in December, 2013, and revealed Donovan’s earlier life in a prequel, A Gentleman’s Memoir, a novella published in August, 2014.

The series quickly became very popular with fans of his RP/character blog, which he’d been writing for almost a year. He credits those fans with this series, since they were the ones who encouraged him to “write a book” and dedicated the books to them.

With his unique voice and writing style, the popularity of the series began to grow, despite the promotion and marketing challenges facing a self-published indie author.

In an original and creative idea, he gave his readers the opportunity to submit “characters” for A Gentleman’s Secret and A Gentleman’s Memoir, which he crafted into the story. The results were intriguing and sometimes hilarious, as he paid the ultimate compliment to his fans and readers…making their characters part of Donovan’s story.

While having full-time job and a very busy life make finding time to write a challenge at times, his readers are in agreement that he has done a fantastic job: four books in two years is quite an accomplishment.

The paperback editions of the series can be found on Amazon. The ebooks are available on Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, and iTunes.

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Guest Post by Sylvain Reynard: Art, Faith, and Vincent van Gogh

I consider myself incredibly blessed that author Sylvain Reynard wrote this beautiful piece on faith and art for my blog.  Reynard is the bestselling author of the Gabriel’s Inferno Series and the Florentine Series.  The next installment of the Florentine Series, The Shadow, is due in February 2016.  

“Art, Faith, and Vincent van Gogh”

By Sylvain Reynard

In my novels, I explore the theme of redemption, along with the themes of faith, hope, and love. The characters themselves have varying beliefs, ranging from atheism to theism. I see each character as being on some sort of spiritual journey.

In what follows, I’d like to explore the connection between art and faith.

Indulge me for a moment and listen to the song “O Theo” by Matthew Perryman Jones:

Matthew Perryman Jones | O Theo

The song lyrics, (which you can read here http://www.songlyrics.com/matthew-perryman-jones/o-theo-lyrics/), are derived from letters written by Vincent van Gogh to his brother, Theo.

The song expresses Vincent’s experience as he struggled to be a preacher and then left that calling.  It also describes a romantic encounter and his longing for home. But there’s more to it.

Now consider this painting:

http://www.moma.org/collection/object.php?object_id=79802

“Starry Night” is a painting of a skyline. It’s about a view of the sky and the stars and the buildings and trees below.  But there’s more to it.

I’ve chosen these two artistic works to illustrate a couple of points.

1)   Good art elicits a feeling of awe and transcendence in its audience.

I use “art” here to include not only the visual arts, but also the performing arts.

The feeling of awe elicited by good art is similar to what the Romantic poets and thinkers identified as the Sublime.

2)   Good art points to a transcendent reality that includes truth, beauty, and goodness.

Not only does art elicit an experience of awe in the audience, but art also points to something beyond itself – something transcendent.

3)   In my view, the transcendent reality that is truth, beauty, and goodness, is the object of faith.

It’s part of the human condition to long for home, as expressed in Vincent’s words to his brother.  We all long to be accepted, to love and be loved, for forgiveness, grace, and peace. We long for the sublime, the transcendent, the beautiful, and the good, even when we get so confused about the truth of those things we go searching for them in self-destructive and harmful places.

But every question has an answer. Every desire has an object.  And the object of our longing for home is precisely the object of faith, in my view.

There’s something about art (and especially good art) that stirs these questions while also pointing to the answers.

I try to express some of these ideas through my attempt at art, which is writing novels. But I tend to see it most clearly in the creative efforts of others, particularly in paintings and in music. I see it in van Gogh, whose work I admire very much.

What’s the piece of art or artistic expression that invokes feelings of the transcendent or the sublime in you?

-SR

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71mExEKHmPU

You can purchase Sylvain Reynard’s books here

Jurassic World: Every Bit as Good as I Hoped (No Spoilers)

I saw Jurassic World this morning.  It was amazing.

It has been a while since I’ve seen a movie that has every little detail so clearly thought out, from product placement to story and character development.

And then there are the dinosaurs.

Without spoiling anything, here are my initial thoughts:

  • Jurassic World feels perfect.  After so many years, it’s the perfect movie coming at the perfect time.  It’s clear that the writers and producers wanted to be certain that they had a great story instead of bowing to pressure to get a fourth movie made.
  • Jurassic World is the tale of a theme park in transition, competing with the demands of fickle and ever-hungry guests who are always looking for more, bigger and better.  Even the park’s layout is reminiscent of Disneyland, with an entryway mall (Main Street) leading to the main building (the Castle) and the T-Rex paddock off to the left (Adventureland)
  • It isn’t preachy.  Yes, there are messages in the movie, and they’re important and timely.  But you don’t feel like the message is being jammed down your throat.
  • It’s a great movie.  You’re hooked from the first moment, and the action never stops.
  • Chris Pratt owns his role.  He was so good that I’d love a Jurassic World prequel, featuring the story of how he came to the park in the first place.
  • It’s very much a dinosaur movie.  This time, the dinosaurs are main characters

If you haven’t seen Jurassic World, you’re in for a treat.  I’m eager to hear what you think about it!

Cover Reveal! The Shadow, Sylvain Reynard’s sequel to The Raven!

It’s here!  At long last we finally know the title of Sylvain Reynard’s new book! We also get a peek at the beautiful cover!
image

The Shadow is the highly anticipated sequel to The Raven and is the second book in Reynard’s thrilling Florentine Series, due out February 2, 2016. Read on for juicy details and links to order your copy!

New York Times bestselling author Sylvain Reynard presents the hotly anticipated, intoxicating follow-up to The Raven

Raven Wood’s vampyre prince has returned, pledging his love and promising
justice for every wrong done to her. In the wake of their reunion, Raven is faced
with a terrible decision—allow the Prince to wreak vengeance against the
demons of her past, or persuade him to stay his hand. But there is far more at
stake than Raven’s heart…

A shadow has fallen over the city of Florence. Ispettor Batelli will not rest until he
uncovers Raven’s connection to the theft of the priceless art from the Uffizi
Gallery. And while the Prince hunts a traitor who sabotages him at every turn, he
finds himself the target of the vampyres’ mortal enemy.

As he wages a war on two fronts, he will need to keep his love for Raven secret,
or risk exposing his greatest weakness…
Click below to pre-order your copy of The Shadow!
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25476303-the-shadow

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-shadow-sylvain-reynard/1121863842?ean=9780425266502&itm=1&usri=9780425266502&cm_mmc=AFFILIATES-_-Linkshare-_-GwEz7vxblVU-_-10:1&r=1,%201

http://www.indiebound.org/book/9780425266502

http://www.amazon.com/Shadow-Florentine-Sylvain-Reynard-ebook/dp/B00X593E5G/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&sr=&qid=

http://www.bookdepository.com/Shadow-Sylvain-Reynard/9780425266502?&a_aid=goodreads

An Interview with Debbie Lynn Smith, Creator of Gates of Midnight

In early March I had the pleasure of meeting Debbie Lynn Smith, creator of the amazing new comic series Gates of Midnight, at the Long Beach Comic Expo. We’ll be taking a closer look at this magnificent new series from Kymera Press in upcoming posts, but for now, let’s meet Debbie Lynn Smith.

 

Interview with Debbie Lynn Smith

Creator, Gates of Midnight

Interview by Sarabeth Pollock

Would you do us the honor of introducing yourself?  Can you tell us about your incredible experiences in television?

I’m Debbie Daughetee, but I write under my maiden name, Debbie Lynn Smith or D. Lynn Smith.  I was a television writer for many years (as Debbie Smith) and wrote for such shows as Murder, She Wrote; Touched by an Angel and Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman.

You have mentioned that you could have published Gates of Midnight through major publishers, but you decided to self-publish through Kymera Press in order to maintain full creative control of your book.  What was this important to you?

I did have interest from several independent publishers but I felt strongly enough about certain issues that publishing Gates myself seemed the right thing to do.

Part of the mission of Kymera Press is to depict women as they are with realistic bodies.  I acknowledge the right of creators/artists to use the exaggerated hyper-sexual bodies common to some comics, but I didn’t want to have that in my comic.  If you publish through another publisher, you can’t control the ads that are placed in your comic.  I was on a panel at Loncon 3 last year with a man who said that he bought a comic book for his five-year-old daughter and was appalled to find a sadomasochistic ad for another comic in the book.  He used a black marker to draw over it so his daughter wouldn’t see it.  I didn’t want that to happen to Gates or any of the comics I help develop.  So I decided to start my own publishing company.

When did you know you wanted to be a writer?

That’s actually a funny story.  I’ve been writing since I was eight-years-old.  But I never thought about making it a career.  After doing some plays in high school and college, I decided to be an actress.  But when I moved to California and saw how my friends who had dedicated themselves to this goal lived, I quickly changed my mind.  Keep in mind I’d been writing all this time.

I then took a short story writing class through the extension program at UCLA taught by horror writer Dennis Etchison.  He brought a lot of writers in to lecture to the class:  George Clayton Johnson, Clive Barker, Ray Bradbury and Bill Nolan.  Amazing, right?  Anyway, both Dennis and Bill Nolan made me believe I could be a writer.  They invited me to my first writer’s convention (World Fantasy) and showed me the ropes.  At that convention I met the man who would get me into television.

Talk about a few of the people who have inspired you over the years.  Who are your mentors?

As I mentioned above, Dennis Etchison and Bill Nolan were instrumental in making me believe in myself as a writer.  Charles de Lint is another writer who believed in my writing and was very supportive.  In television, Carol Mendelsohn took the time to educate her writer’s assistant (me) in what it took to write a television script.  So I had a lot of help from some really wonderful writers.

Who is your favorite author?

I really hate this question—no offense—because it’s so difficult to answer.  I have favorite books spread across the spectrum of writers.  One is Night Circus, by Erin Morgenstern.  Both the Shining and The Stand by Stephen King.  And, of course Tolkein.

In comics it is the writer and the artist who create a good story so:  North 40 by Aaron Williams and Fiona Stapleton, Gotham Academy by Becky Coonan and Brenden Fletcher and Kark Kerschl, Bitch Planet by Kelly Sue Deconnick and Valentine DeLandro and Lazarus by Greg Rucka and Michael Lark.

Are there any aspects of your character in Raven’s character?

My father was a police officer in a small town in Ohio. There was always the threat of something happening to him.  So I decided to give Raven that trauma as the inciting incident in Gates so I can explore my own fears growing up.

What can we expect in future issues of Gates of Midnight?

Monsters, of course.  But also a look at different social issues we are facing.  I don’t want to make Gates into an issue of the month comic.  But I do like to acknowledge that there are problems in our society.  Like homeless vets and vets struggling with PTSD.  In issue #5 I introduce a homeless transgender character to explore the stereotypes and problems facing transgender people.  So we’ll keep exploring the theme of who are the monsters, the creatures coming through the gates… or us.

Given all of the hats you’ve worn, what do you love about working on a comic book?

I love the collaborative environment of the comic book.  Every artist brings something to the story that gives it a depth my words alone can’t give it.  I work with amazing artists who are dedicated to bringing my vision to life, even if I haven’t always visualized it very well.

Talk about your experiences as a comic creator at comic conventions.  What’s it like to talk with fans of the book? 

Gates of Midnight is our first title, so the Long Beach Comic Expo was the first convention where we actually had a dealers table.  We’re just building a fan base.  I will say that people have been very enthusiastic and supportive of our mission and of the comic.  I’m beginning to get letters from people who are suffering from PTSD telling me that they are happy to read about someone who has the same problems they do.  That is very gratifying.

Do you have a dream cast in mind should GoM make it to the big screen?

Ha!  You know, I haven’t spent any time thinking about that.  I’m so busy with Gates and our new title, Pet Noir, which will premiere at San Diego Comic Con, that I haven’t had much time for anything else.  That being said, I did use actors as models for my characters.  Raven was modeled on Audrey Hepburn. Alex, Keanu Reeves, Constance – a mix between Angelina Jolie and Uma Thurman.  Marie- Susan Sullivan.

Tell me about your creative team.  It seems like you have quite the dream team working with you!  Can you talk about the experience of working with an all female creative team?

I’ve love working with each of our artists.  Amelia Woo is always working to find a better way to present Gates.  She’s doing the covers starting with Issue #5, and they’re going to blow you away.  Unfortunately, Mirana Reveier, our colorist, has withdrawn from our project.  It was her work that gave Gates the distinct, gritty urban look.  Luckily I was able to find another incredible colorist, Sandra Molina.  She and Amelia are working together closely on Issue #5.  While Sandra is duplicating what Mirana did, she’s also bring her own unique talent to the pages and I think readers are going to be thrilled with her work.

Where did you come up with the idea for GoM?

Back in my other life as a television writer, Barbara Hambly and I came up with and pitched Gates as a television pilot.  This was the origin of Gates of Midnight.

Who is Raven Moon?  Is she based on a real life character?

I didn’t really base Raven on a real character.  I did have a few people in mind when writing her, people who had a characteristic I thought would suit her character.

Raven is a combat medic who served in Afghanistan and has PTSD as a result.  How important is her background, especially her military service, to her character?

It’s essential.  Her boyfriend died in front of her eyes.  She was wounded.  She’s now suffering from PTSD and has lost the father who grounded her.  She’s angry and scared and somewhat at a loss at how to live life.  And then gods and monsters get thrown in the mix…

Is there anything you’d like to do that you haven’t done yet?

I’m not sure what you mean—personally or in the comic?  Personally, oh yes.  I’d like to travel more.  I have other projects I’d like to write.  In Gates, oh yes.  There’s lots to come.

How far ahead have you planned GoM?  Can readers expect story arcs in the future, or is there one main storyline that you want to follow?

I actually have 48 issues planned.  Yeah, I plan ahead.  I don’t know if Gates will go 48 issues, it depends on how it is received.  Every 4 issues will have some kind of arc.  The story continues past that arc, but I’ve written each 4 issue series so the arc is somewhat like the 4 acts of a one hour television show.  I want the reader to come back after the 4th issue, but I also want the reader to feel satisfied that they got something out of each set of 4.

Kymera Press has the best motto ever: “We’re not asking for permission…”  How did that come about?

It’s sort of been the motto for my life.  When I was a teenager, my younger sister asked me how I got to do all the things I did.  I told her because I don’t ask for permission.  If I asked, my Dad would have said NO.  When I first got into television as a writer’s assistant, people kept telling me that it was impossible to sell a spec script.  I ignored them, and I sold a spec and launched my career.  Now I’m doing comics using an all-female creative team with women friendly content.  People are telling me I won’t be able to make it as a) a publisher and b) the comic won’t sell if it doesn’t have the kind of content that attracts teenage boys.  Quite frankly I think they are underestimating teenage boys, but regardless, I’m simply not asking for anyone’s permission to support female artists in this way.

In the first issue of GoM you spend some time at the back of the book talking about how GoM was originally a television pilot inspired by Johnathon Keel’s The Mothman Prophecies.  What was it about that book that inspired you to create GoM?

I loved the idea that there was a Gate that opened to another world and that there were creatures on the other side of that gate.  It’s as simple as that.  Just think of the possibilities.

“Kymera Press is proud to be making a place for women in comics.”  What is it like being at the forefront of providing an outlet for women in comics?  Do you feel any pressure in that role?

Quite frankly I don’t feel like I’m at the forefront at all.  So many women have come before me, blazing a path that makes what I’m doing possible.  There’s a wonderful documentary out there called She Makes Comics that interviews the women who have been active in comics from the past to present day.  I recommend anyone who thinks that women in comics is a new thing watch this documentary.  The only pressure I feel is the pressure all comic creators feel, the pressure to create a quality product that I can be proud of.

How important is it for you personally to be writing stories for women, given that women are the fastest growing demographic in comics?

I don’t know that I’m actually writing comics for women.  I’m simply writing about a strong female protagonist who has flaws.  I’m not using any kind of exaggerated anatomy and I don’t have graphic sexual content.  There are quite a few men out there who have read Gates and are enjoying it.

What advice would you have for young women writers and artists who want to break into the comic industry?

Oh, I’m so glad you asked.  Many woman are timid about displaying their work.  They either a) are afraid they’re not good enough or b) afraid to garner criticism.  I relate to both.  But the thing is, YOU CANNOT LET EITHER OF THESE THINGS STOP YOU FROM GETTING OUT THERE.  The difference between men and women is that men have a lot more self-confidence and don’t really worry about whether or not they’re good enough.  They don’t hesitate to put their work out there so it’s much easier to find men artists, colorist and letterers (especially letterers) than it is finding women.  So, get your art up on deviant art and other sites.  Listen to any constructive critiques you receive, chuck the rest.  Remember, you DON’T HAVE TO ASK FOR PERMISSION.

Are there any opportunities for people to get involved with Kymera Press? 

At the moment I’m stretched to the limit (and beyond) as is my budget.  If there’s anyone who wants to volunteer to help with social media, a kickstarter project or something along those lines, I’d love to talk to that person.  Also, we would love to have some guest bloggers.

What’s next for Kymera Press?  What projects are coming down the pipe?

Our next project is called Pet Noir, based on the novel of the same name by Pati Nagle.  It’s about Leon, a genetically altered cat who is a spy on a space station.  The first script is being tweaked as we speak.  All of my artists are hired and waiting in the wings.  I’m very excited about this property because it will have a much lighter feel than Gates.  It will also be more appropriate for a younger audience.

We’re also working on additional content for the first Gates of Midnight Graphic Novel, which will collect the first four issues in one place.  Our editor Valerie D’Orazio wrote a short script about one of our minor characters, and our artists for Pet Noir are doing the art.  I thought it would be a great way to introduce our Gates readers to our new artists, and give Valerie a chance to show off her writing skills.

You’re a very busy lady!  Can you tell us about some of the things you’re working on?  Will you be attending any comic conventions in the next few months?

Kymera Press will have a table at C2E2 in Chicago at the end of April.  We’ll have the first 4 issues of Gates of Midnight, along with T-shirts and art prints for sale.  This is our first big convention and we’re very excited about it.

I’ll be doing some smaller conventions in Albuquerque, Madison WI, another in Long Beach and some appearances here in Vegas.  We were lucky enough to get a small press table at San Diego Comic Con in July and we’re hoping our readers come by and visit with us.  After all, they’re why we do this.  Readers can sign up for our newsletter at Kymerapress.com for news of what we have going on and what conventions we’ll be attending.

The Prince Speaks: An Interview with Sylvain Reynard’s Vampyre Prince of Florence

Recently I had the incredible honor of interviewing the Prince of Florence.  If you’re not familiar with his story, I urge you to read his introduction in Sylvain Reynard’s novella The Prince, as well as The Raven, which is the first installment of the Florentine Series.  The Prince also appears briefly in Gabriel’s Redemption; unbeknownst to Professor Gabriel Emerson and his lovely wife, Julia, the Prince is tied to the Emersons in ways they cannot yet comprehend. 

I would like to thank the Prince of Florence for agreeing to do this interview, and many thanks go out to Sylvain Reynard for making it possible.

Without further ado, I present to you the Prince of Florence.

Would you do us the honor of introducing yourself?

(The Prince looks around, obviously uncomfortable with his surroundings)

 I am the Prince of Florence.

How would you describe yourself?

As the darkness made visible.

 Is there anywhere else in the world that captures your interest as much as Florence?

I have a fondness for Rome and the city of York but for various reasons, I rarely leave the confines of Florence.

 What is your favorite book?

Lately, I’ve been entranced by “A Discovery of Witches.” It was very educational. (Author’s note: Deborah Harkness is the author of A Discovery of Witches and her All Souls Trilogy is soon to be featured on the BBC)

 You’ve been around since the 13th century.  In your estimation, what has been the most significant historical event you’ve witnessed?

I never discuss the event that had the most personal significance to me.

 But I can tell you the rise of the Black Death was incredibly significant for Florence and for my brethren.

 I’m a huge fan of Shakespeare.  In Sonnet 116, the Bard talks about the human frailty and the passage of time.  Love, however, is immortal.  “Love alters not with its brief hours and weeks but bears it out even to the edge of doom.”   Your thoughts?

 I’m afraid I’m new to the subject of love. My kind know little enough of it. But for the sake of a particular pair of green eyes, I’m willing to learn.

 Did you know that there is a whole genre of fiction, called paranormal romance, which revolves around women and vampires as lovers?  Would you have ever thought such a thing could be?

 I have a difficult time imagining such a thing.  If this kind of literature truly exists, it would pose a grave security risk.

 I must inform the other principalities …

 What would you like your legions of fans to know about you?

Fans?

 What is your definition of beauty?

I think women are beautiful. I like their softness and the way they smell.  But a woman who lacks intellect and a strong character is unattractive.

 “With great power comes great responsibility.”  Your thoughts?

It’s certainly true. But the question is what is one willing to do in order to maintain one’s power …

 Should humans fear vampyres?

Without qualification.

 You rule over the beautiful city of Florence.  Are there places in the world that are not good environments for vampyres?

Sunny climates are not especially conducive to vampyres, nor are areas built atop consecrated ground.

 Are there things you love about being a vampyre?  What don’t you enjoy?

We have time enough to spare and we heal quickly.

 I have trouble remembering what it was like to be human.  I miss the ability to sleep.

 In Interview with the Vampire, the reporter Daniel asks Louis if he can look at crucifixes and whether or not he sleeps in a coffin.   We know you’re very special (we won’t tell anyone, Mr. York!), but are there traits that all vampyres share?  Can you give us a primer?  Vampyres 101?

Vampyres are a kind of animal. They prey on humans and reproduce through the exchange of blood.  They have enemies, as every predator is prey to something.

 Your relationship with Raven is very special.  Why Raven?  What draws you to her?

In short, she’s beautiful and she has an exceptional mind. I’m drawn to her character and her very being.

 What does Raven mean to you?

It can’t be put into words.

Raven was able to get you to watch a film with her.  The Godfather.  Has she been trying to introduce you to other modern wonders?  What has captured your interest so far?

The film was interesting, to a point. She tried to get me to watch Star Wars, which reminded me very much of the Middle Ages. Jawas are Franciscans and the Jedi are Jesuits. I had trouble identifying the Benedictines and Dominicans.

When did you learn to ride a motorcycle?

 Many years ago.

What made you choose a Triumph as your motorcycle of choice?

A respectable vampyre wouldn’t choose anything else. It has to do with the way the bike handles and also the sound of the motor. Ducatis and Harley Davidsons simply can’t compete.

 Do you ever drive cars?  Which would you prefer—an Italian car, like a Ferrari or Lamborghini, or a British car, say, an Aston Martin or Lotus?

I’ve driven cars in the past – I favour Ferrari. But I prefer my motorcycle.

 Quickfire thoughts on the following:

 Anne Rice – Gifted

Bram Stoker – A paid propagandist

Women’s Fashion – I am more interested in what my woman looks like under her clothes …

Honor – Priceless

Love – Immortal

I can only imagine that Sylvain Reynard is a wonderful guide through your adventures.  We know you’re not fond of Dante, but SR does resemble Virgil in his own way. Can you describe your relationship with SR?

If he were the one responsible for revealing our secrets, I’d say his life would be very short-lived. Perhaps someone ought to advise him of this.

I’d like to thank the Prince for taking the time out of his busy schedule to do this interview.  If you’ll excuse me, I think I might need to send a note of warning to Mr. Reynard….

My Con Schedule (So Far)

I’m happy to report that I’ll be attending several cons this year to provide coverage for Dark Media Online.  My press badges have been approved and I’m ready to go.  (I even have a photographer, aka my trusty sister who is a photographic genius)

This weekend is the Long Beach Comic Expo.  This is the sister event to the Long Beach Comic Con in September, and while the focus is on comics, there is already a ton of cosplay planned, along with panels and screenings.

In April I’ll be heading up the 5 to Anaheim to cover the Star Wars Celebration.  I’m really excited about this event, even though Jawas terrified me when I was younger.  (Don’t tell anyone, but they still do)  I can only imagine how great the event will be this year with the new film set for release.  Mark Hamill has been confirmed as a guest, as are the actors behind C3PO and R2D2.  It’s going to be phenomenal.

And now that my press badge for San Diego Comic Con has just been approved, so you can expect to see tons of coverage both here and at DarkMediaOnline.com.  We should be podcasting by that point as well, so watch for updates.  SDCC means a long (15-minute drive) Downtown for me, so you can be assured of tons of pre-convention coverage as the signage goes up and the Exhibit Hall takes shape.  It’s also fun to wander the Gaslamp to see what is moving in for SDCC.  (Remember the Godzilla building?  We drove by last week and the Legendary art is still inside)

Lots of good things to come in the next few weeks/months, so stay tuned!